Category: Mule ESB

Happy Friday Everyone!

This week’s featured Muley comes from our Documentation team! Robin Pille is the Technical Writer that helps make our Mule Documentation awesome. When she’s not immersed in a book or munching on a baguette, she’s probably out dancing the lindy hop.

First thought that came to mind when you looked into the mirror today?

  • I wish I had time to iron this blazer.

How did you find MuleSoft?

  • MuleSoft found me.

How did you first get interested in your field?

When we announced the December 2013 release, an exciting new feature also saw daylight: The Batch Module. If you haven’t read the post describing the feature’s highlights, you should, but today I’d like to focus on how the <batch:commit>block interacts with Anypoint™ Connectors and more specifically, how you can leverage your own connectors to take advantage of the feature.

<batch:commit> overview

In a nutshell, you can use a Batch Commit block to collect a subset of records for bulk upsert to an external source or service. For example, rather than upserting each individual contact (i.e. record) to Google Contacts, you can configure a Batch Commit to collect, lets say 100 records, and then upsert all of them to Google Contacts in one chunk. Within a batch step – the only place you can apply it – you can use a Batch Commit to wrap an outbound message processor. See the example below:



It sounds like the title for a fantasy movie, but Google, OAuth and the “confused deputy” is a very common issue. Wikipedia defines a confused deputy as “a computer program that is innocently fooled by some other party into misusing its authority. It is a specific type of privilege escalation” (complete article here).

The Wikipedia article shares an example of a compiler exposed as a paid service. This compiler receives an input source code file and the path where the compiled binary is to be stored. This compiler also keeps a file called BILLING where billing information is updated each time a compilation is requested. If a user were to request a compilation setting the output path to “BILLING”, then the file would be overwritten and the billing information lost. In this case, the compiler is a “confused deputy” because although the client doesn’t have access to the file, it’s tricked the compiler (who does have access) into altering the file.

When looking at options for your next generation integration platform, the development language of the underlying ESB should not be a primary concern. .NET teams in particular often constrain their search to only .NET-centric ESBs, ultimately leaving them few options. If you find yourself in this position, here are a few things to consider:

  • At its core an ESB is all about interoperability.
    A strong ESB will support a broad range of standards, protocols, and adapters, enabling integration of services and applications written in any language or platform. A Best of Breed ESB doesn’t care if the services it is connecting are written in Java or C#.
  • A Best of Breed ESB will enable the majority of integration work to be done through tools that are easy to learn and provide visibility into what is happening in the ESB, rarely requiring developers to write or debug code.
  • When code is required for customizing integrations, the ESB should provide frameworks, APIs, and templates for the customization. So, for example, a .NET developer customizing a good Java-based ESB would use a small subset of Java, primarily needing to understand Java syntax, not the full breadth of Java technology. A Best of Breed ESB should also be extendable with other familiar languages, such as JavaScript or Python.
  • Java and C#, the predominant languages in the enterprise, are nearly identical in syntax.

So how should you choose the best ESB solution? As you begin the journey to evaluating your next generation integration platform there are critical components that will help you connect, implement, and deploy faster:

The recent growth of SaaS applications, systems, and services in the market has greatly impacted how we approach enterprise architecture. Data now resides beyond the enterprise firewall and needs to be controlled and managed – a problem made increasingly difficult by the growing popularity of bring your own device (BYOD) policies.

Hybrid integration bridges the network divide between existing enterprise databases, warehouses, applications, legacy systems and SaaS, B2B, B2C, BYOD, and big data. It leverages new systems to make way for innovation, competitive advantage, and driving new business models, allowing on-premise applications to seamlessly integrate with cloud based ones. MuleSoft helps enterprises connect applications both on-premise and in the cloud, simplifying the integration process and allow for seamless hybrid integration.

Here’s our weekly roundup of the top 5 integration and API articles of the week.  Take a look, let us know if we missed any, and share your thoughts in the comments.  Don’t forget to follow @MuleSoft to stay up-to-date on integration & APIs!


Why the Internet of Things Is More 1876 Than 1995

Looking back into history helps us understand our present and future. The Industrial Revolution hit its critical mass in 1876. The Internet of Things has hit that point today.

 

Enterprise Security Professionals Identify Mobile Computing Security Challenges

It’s clear BYOD has changed enterprise IT, but that doesn’t make it any less of a security nightmare. Data security, security policies, and integration top the list of problems.

 

Pablo La Greca on Tuesday, February 11, 2014

APIs: A new path to SOA

2

Long ago, enterprise companies started using software to manage information across the enterprise. As the number of systems within the enterprise grew, the need to synchronize all these isolated systems emerged. From this came the need to find a solution allowing system-to-system communication, and the easiest approach for this was point-to-point integration. Soon, enterprises found themselves with several systems interconnected via point-to-point integration, resulting in a maintenance nightmare. Rather than being unified, each system had it’s own communication protocol – some were file based, others were databases, and if we were lucky, some of them used web services.

The mess began to look something like this:

Here’s our weekly roundup of the top 5 integration and API articles of the week.  Take a look, let us know if we missed any, and share your thoughts in the comments.  Don’t forget to follow @MuleSoft to stay up-to-date on integration & APIs!


Why Are We Still Talking About Software Integration?

Software integration used to be the customer’s headache in the days of on-premise solutions, but the cloud has changed all that. So why are we still talking about it?

 

Dark Matter in the API Universe

96% of the mass of the universe is represented by something we can’t observe – dark matter. In the API universe far more organizations are building private APIs as opposed to public API programs. This is the dark matter of the API universe.

 

A typical Mule user can:

  • On-ramp in 5 days
  • Deliver projects 4x faster than traditional SOA
  • Deliver projects 8x faster than point-to-point approaches

What if you could deliver an integration project up to 8 times faster?  With the Anypoint Platform from MuleSoft, you can.  Join MuleSoft founder Ross Mason and Sr. Product Manager Steven Camina for a demo-driven walkthrough and discussion in, “Mule 101: Rapidly Connect Anything, Anywhere.” They’ll demonstrate how you can integrate faster with the Anypoint Platform by:

Here’s our weekly roundup of the top 5 integration and API articles of the week.  Take a look, let us know if we missed any, and share your thoughts in the comments.  Don’t forget to follow @MuleSoft to stay up-to-date on integration & APIs!

5 hybrid IT roles your business needs to succeed in 2014

It’s clear that 2014 will be dominated by the integration of big data analytics, cloud computing, mobile, and social media into the enterprise. But what are the best IT roles to push this shift?

  

 The Industrial Enterprise Internet of Things

Data is business and businesses themselves are data streams. Every aspect of the business represents a quantifiable piece of data. Welcome to the Industrial Enterprise Internet of Things.