Get your Mule 3.3 Refcard from DZone

December 30 2012

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Just a quick one today since you’re probably busy getting ready for the New Year (or clearing out your bunker after the world didn’t end on Christmas Eve as they Mayans predicated).  Either way we recommend that you go download and print the Mule 3 Refcard from DZone.  If you haven’t seen these reference cards before they are a great companion for working with many open source and commercial platforms. Th Mule 3.3 Refcard will guide you through the basics as well as provide examples for working with components , filters, annotations and exception handling.  You can get yours here.

Holiday Reading: Mule in Action

December 28 2012

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You’re going to read more in 2013, right? Well lets get you started with this sample chapter, Implementation Patterns in Mule from the forthcoming Mule in Action book from Manning Publishing.  This book is the ultimate companion for anyone using Mule and Manning run an early access program so you get get you hands on 8 chapters currently and even pre-order the book. Enjoy!

Introducing Mule Studio 3.4 Early Preview

December 11 2012

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We are excited to announce the availability of the first early preview release of Mule Studio 3.4. This release is aligned with the release of the Mule ESB CE Milestone 2 to the community.

We are making this release of Studio available to the Mule community to get valuable feedback on our latest and greatest features. This blog post contains text and video introductions to the freshly-baked features included in this release.

As you read through this post and try the Studio features, please keep in mind that this is a pre-Beta version. Explore, discover and play, but do not use it to develop Mule apps for use in production.

One Studio

December 10 2012

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Integration is becoming such a critical part of application development that we spend many of our cycles on making Mule easier for any developer to use. Mule Studio was built to address the needs of developers who don’t wake up every morning thinking about integration.

Mule Component Bindings

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I had the privilege of speaking at the Mule Summit in Chicago a few weeks ago. During my presentation, I covered some key Mule ESB features we leverage at Express Scripts: Component Bindings and Custom Configuration Patterns. Few conference attendees were familiar with these features, so we thought blog posts would help share information about these features with a broader audience. In this post, I’ll focus on Component Bindings. A future post will cover Custom Configuration Patterns.

Cross domain REST calls using CORS

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To fight XSS attacks, the web browser imposes the same origin policy for HTTP requests made by JavaScript code:

But there are a lot of use cases where this kind of cross domain HTTP request is desired, so developers came up with some workarounds:

  • Server side proxy: the idea is to avoid cross domain requests in the browser by doing them on the server:To do that in Mule you can use the HTTP proxy pattern as explained in this post.

Lightweight RPC with ØMQ and Protocol Buffers

November 5 2012

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A frequent issue I come across writing integration applications with Mule is deciding how to communicate back and forth between my front end application, typically a web or mobile application, and a flow hosted on Mule.

I could use web services and do something like annotate a component with JAX-RS and expose this out over HTTP.  This is potentially overkill,  particularly if I only want to host a few methods, the methods are asynchronous or I don’t want to deal with the overhead of HTTP.  It also could be a lot of extra effort if the only consumers of the API, at least initially, are internal facing applications.

Extending Mule: How to a release a new version of your custom extension

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Today I would like to talk a little bit about releasing a new version of your Mule extensions.  As you may know Mule is a an extensible platform with well defined integration points for plugging in your own connectors transformations, components and even routers. Suppose you have used The Mule Devkit to create your very own extension or cloud connector, and your project is so cool that it was accepted on MuleForge.

What happens if you make changes to you project and it moves from version 1.0 to 1.1? We’ll take a very quick look at how to do that in this post.

First, modify your pom.xml to increase your version number. In this case, we’ll go from 1.0 to 1.1:

<groupId>org.mule.modules</groupId>
<artifactId>cool-connector</artifactId>
<version>1.1</version>
<packaging>mule-module</packaging>

    

Extending Mule with DevKit – the LDAPConnector

October 23 2012

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Mule’s extension capabilities multiply its power as an integration platform and range from simple expressions to custom cloud connectors: wherever a configuration value is expected, expressions can be applied in various languages, including our new Mule Expression Language, so that the same value is calculated at run-time; our Scripting processors allow you to execute custom logic in Groovy, Python, Ruby, JavaScript, PHP and indeed any language which implements the JSR-223 scripting spec for the JVM; and of course Java components can be invoked too. Our extensible platform goes even further with the addition of custom Cloud Connectors with already over a hundred to choose from. These greatly simplify any interaction with a public API whether it be exposed on the cloud or on-premise. They come with connection-pooling and automated reconnection strategies.

Automate your deployments with the Jenkins API

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The Jenkins build systemhas an open API which means we can do stuff with it. Today we’re going to automate the deployment of an application with a specific stable version.  Jenkins has a great UI, it’s very flexible indeed, but sometimes is not enough. For instance, for CloudHub we deploy a Jenkins build to our QA environment, according the period in our development cycle, and we also need to execute automated tests. However, we can create a quick web application to choose a version of an application in  Jenkins to deploy, using Mule Studio and CloudHub.