Twitter your Blog with iBeans

December 9 2009

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Most websites offer RSS or ATOM feeds for news or updates, and iBeans makes it easy to consume these feeds. In this example, I will create a simple object that will read new entries from my blog and publish a summary of them on Twitter. Note that the example assumes that you have iBeans installed.

Getting Started with iBeans in Eclipse

November 11 2009

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This screen cast takes you through all the steps necessary to download and set up iBeans, Tomcat and Eclipse. Then there is a walk-through of how to create a simple echo example (using AJAX) and test/debug the application on Tomcat. Yes, this is 11 minutes but it does walk through all the steps and provides a lot of additional detail. Grab yourself a beverage and take the the tour!

iBeans introductory screencast

November 4 2009

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I just finished an iBeans screen cast that provides an overview of iBeans and provides a detailed tour of one of the examples that ships with the latest distribution. The example demonstrates how to schedule a task and perform bi-directional AJAX communication with the browser to plot geo-coordinates onto a map. This is the first in a series of screen casts for iBeans, the next one will demonstrate how to create an iBeans project in Eclipse.

Finding bad code

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Several years ago, I moved into Product Management, and progressively my time writing code has diminished. Hanging out with the super smart developers at MuleSoft has made me realize how much I missed the days of writing code. So I wanted to get back to doing some code, and what better way to do it than to write a few JSPs? JSPs are easy to write, and you get instant gratification as well.

Interoperating With .NET Web Services

September 25 2009

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There are use cases where you may want to send a message through HTTP, File, or another transport to a .NET Web Service. Using Mule ESB, it’s fairly straight-forward to accomplish this.

Consider this use case:

Recompiling Tomcat May Cause Runtime Problems

September 24 2009

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It’s a very good thing that Tomcat is open source software. Because it is open, it enjoys broad stand-alone adoption, plus it has been incorporated as part of many other application server products, both commercial and open source. Why reinvent the wheel when Tomcat works great as a generic web container, and the source code is free? Many smart application server teams have chosen to embed Tomcat as their web container. They pull a copy of the Tomcat source code that they know works well,

Overcoming XML Validation Errors in Eclipse 3.5

September 21 2009

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When I recently switched to Eclipse Galileo, I noticed that a Mule configuration file that had previously validated correctly now had validation errors. Since I did not change the file, something in Galileo’s validation of XML files must have changed.

The symptoms are these:

Tomcat Performance Tuning Tips

September 16 2009

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I often get questions about how to tune Tomcat for better performance.  It is usually best to answer this only after first spending some time understanding the installation of Tomcat, the web site’s traffic level, and the web applications that it runs.  But, there are some general performance tips that apply regardless of these important details.  In general, Tomcat performs better when you:

Whitepaper: Migrating from WebLogic to Tomcat

September 14 2009

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While it has been commonplace (and well documented) for IT organizations to migrate Java EE applications initially developed on Apache Tomcat upward to commercial Java application servers, such as Oracle’s WebLogic, in recent years the trend has been reversing. There are a number of compelling reasons for creating new web applications using today’s deployment architectures on Tomcat instead of WebLogic, but perhaps even more interesting is the trend to migrate existing Java EE applications from WebLogic to Tomcat.

LegStar for Mule Patterns

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Introduction

A pattern is a generic solution to a generic problem that is likely to occur over and over again. Patterns, for the purpose of this article, form a language that system designers can use like recipes: “if you find this type of problem, then you can apply this type of solution”.

In the domain of applications integration, patterns are particularly helpful. Application integration is complex, it typically involves several different systems,