Taking a Rest from Code Camp 2010

October 11 2010

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Code Camp continues to grow by leaps and bounds each year. For those not familiar with Code Camp, it’s an all volunteer run conference at Foothill College each October and is on version 5.0. It lasts the whole weekend and this year over 3000 people registered and over 1900 ended up spending their weekend attending technical sessions ranging from How to Teach Programming to Kids to HTML5 Crash Course.

Speak JavaScript? RESTful web services are belong to you!

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RESTx version 0.9.4: JavaScript everywhere, MIME types and more

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Version 0.9.4 of RESTx – the fastest way to create RESTful web services – has just been released. The main features introduced by this version are the ability to write components in server-side JavaScript, the addition of a JavaScript client library and much improved handling of content types for input and output. You can download it now.

The value of APIs that can be crawled

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Recently, there was an interesting article on ReadWriteWeb questioning the long term effect of the proliferation of public APIs, versus merely offering crawlable data. On one hand – the article argued – APIs offer a great deal of control to the publisher and they are great for access to real-time information. On the other hand, if data is only accessible through an API then it is not available for spiders and crawlers and thus won’t show up in search results.

Laying the foundation for RESTful web services

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Ever now and then you find a new piece of software or feature, which ends up changing the way you work, saving you time and just overall making things easier for you and your organization. We think that the RESTx project with its new 0.9.2 release gains such a feature. We call it “specialized components”. What is that, why is it useful and how will it make things easier for you? In a moment I will use an example for illustration,

RESTx version 0.9.2 released

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Today we are happy to announce the release of version 0.9.2 of RESTx – the fastest and simplest way to create RESTful web services.

Besides the usual, numerous small improvements and fixes there are also a number of exciting major new features and capabilities:

Screencast: From install to RESTful resource in less than 3 minutes

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We have put up a screencast that shows you how to get started with RESTx, our platform for the rapid, easy creation of RESTful web services.

RESTx allows developers to contribute data access, integration and processing components in Java or Python, using a very simple API. Then, with nothing more than a browser and a simple HTML form, users provide parameters for those components,

Easily optimizing Python: Extending with Java

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Our RESTx project – a platform for the rapid and easy creation of RESTful web services and resources – is largely written in Python. Python is a dynamic, duck-typed programming language, which puts very little obstacles between your idea and working code.cartoon_duckcartoon_duck At least that’s the feeling I had when I started to work with Python several years ago: Never before was I able to be so productive, so quickly with so few lines of code.

Turbo charging front-end development with user-created RESTful resources

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In this article, I will show you how RESTx – an open source project for the creation of RESTful web services and RESTful resources – allows front-end developers to quickly and easily make their own data resources, without having to rely on the back-end server team for every new requirement.

Super simple data integration with RESTx: An example

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Most people who ever worked in real-world data integration projects agree that at some point custom code becomes necessary. Pre-fabricated connectors, filter and pipeline logic can only go so far. And to top it off, using those pre-fabricated integration logic components often becomes cumbersome for anything but the most trivial data integration and processing tasks.

With RESTx – a platform for the rapid creation of RESTful web services – we recognize that custom code will always remain part of serious data integration tasks.