Asynchronous Messaging Patterns

Asynchronous messaging enables applications to decouple from one another to improve performance, scalability, and reliability. This post will review the most common messaging patterns, along with why and when to use them. 

So, is a modern microservices architecture the ultimate answer to everything?

This is the third blog in a series explaining how MuleSoft’s Anypoint Platform can provide agile connectivity across monolith, SOA, and microservices architectures.

In my last blog, I reviewed the different types of architectures that have evolved over the last decade and how that has now led to the commonly used microservices architecture approach. This post will discuss whether this is the ultimate answer to architecture development,

The road to microservices: an overview of architectures

This is the second blog in a series explaining how MuleSoft’s Anypoint Platform can provide agile connectivity across monolith, SOA, and microservices architectures

In my last blog post, I discussed the impact agility has on business and IT, what it means for a business to be agile, and how implementing flexibility within your architecture enables business agility. This post will discuss the different architectures that have been prominent in previous years and how they’ve influenced the architecture of today. 

Introducing the Validations Module

This all began with a very popular request: “We want to be able to throw an Exception from a flow”. The motivation for this is that it’s fairly common to run into “business errors” (errors not related to the handling and transmission of data but the data itself) which should actually be treated in the same way as a connection or system error (things like the remote endpoint is down).

Given the popularity of the request we decided to look into it and started by asking: “which are the use cases in which you would throw an exception?”.

Synchronous and Asynchronous Throttling

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One of the most common use cases while building flows/applications in mule is to be able to communicate to external systems. The performance of that external system is often beyond the user’s control. It could be possible where the rate at which mule flow sends the messages outbound is faster than the rate at which that external system could process the message. In such scenarios, there is a need to be able to perform some kind of throttling so that we don’t burden/break the external system.