Batch Module Reloaded

With Mule’s December 2013 release we introduced the new batch module. We received great feedback about it and we even have some CloudHub users happily using it in production! However, we know that the journey of Batch has just begun and for the Early Access release of Mule 3.5 we added a bunch of improvements. Let’s have a look!

Support for not Serializable Objects

A limitation in the first release of batch was that all records needed to have a Serializable payload.

Mule How-to: Build a Batch Enabled Cloud Connector

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When we announced the December 2013 release, an exciting new feature also saw daylight: The Batch Module. If you haven’t read the post describing the feature’s highlights, you should, but today I’d like to focus on how the <batch:commit>block interacts with Anypoint™ Connectors and more specifically, how you can leverage your own connectors to take advantage of the feature.

<batch:commit> overview

In a nutshell,

Batch processing performance in the cloud

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Today I will introduce our performance test of the Batch Module introduced on the Mule’s December 2013 release. I will guide you through the test scenario and explain all the data collected.

But first, if you don’t know what batch is, please read the great Batch Blog from our star developer Mariano Gonzalez, and for any other concerns you also have the documentation.

Data Synchronizing made easy with Watermarks

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We’ve all been there. Sooner or later, someone asks you to periodically synchronize information from one system into another. No shame to admit it, it happens in the best families. Such an integration should start with getting the objects that have been modified since the last sync (or all of them in the case of the very first sync). Sure, this first part sounds like the easiest of all the sync process (and in some cases it actually is),

When ETL met the ESB: Introducing the Batch Module

We are all very proud to announce that Mule’s December 2013 release shipped with a major leap forward feature that will massively change and simplify Mule’s user experience for both SaaS and On-Premise users. Yes, we are talking about the new Batch jobs. If you need to handle massive amounts of data, or you’re longing for record based reporting and error handling, or even if you are all about resilience and reliability with parallel processing,

Iterating on our release strategy: Mule ESB, Mule Studio, CloudHub

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In the past, as now, Mule ESB follows a release schedule that introduces a new version of our industry-leading ESB software every 9 – 12 months, supplemented with maintenance releases approximately every 6 months. Though this cadence fit very tightly with the demands of our customers who deploy Mule on premises, we came to realize that our customers deploying Mule to CloudHub were much more flexible in terms of updating versions of software,

MuleSoft Update: Summits, API Management, Dataloader.io, Gartner MQ and Anypoint Edge

September 23 2013

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We have a lot of cool things happening at MuleSoft, here is a quick round up of things you shouldn’t miss.

MuleSoft SummitMuleSoft Summit
Discover how to take your integration strategy to the next level at MuleSoft Summit — coming to a city near you this Fall! Join the core MuleSoft team and integration experts to learn best practices and empower your development team to stay one step ahead of evolving business needs.

NoSQL and Big Data connectors for Mule

September 19 2013

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In the past few months, you may have noticed that we have regularly announced the release of new Mule connectors for NoSQL data-stores. Two main forces are at play behind the need for these types of data-stores:

  • Big Data – The need to deal in realtime or near-realtime with the vast amounts of data “web-scale” applications can generate,
  • BASE vs ACID – The need to scale reliably in the unreliable environment that is the cloud leading to the relaxation of RDBM’s ACID properties (Atomicity,

Aggregation with Mule – “Fork and join pattern”

September 12 2013

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In your daily work as an integration developer you’re working with different kinds of patterns, even if you’re not aware of it.

Since Mule is based on EIP (Enterprise Integration Patterns) you’re most definitely using patterns when using Mule.

One of those patterns that seems to raise a lot of questions is the “fork and join pattern”. The purpose of the fork and join pattern is to send a request to different targets,

Mule and Redis get a web bug

September 10 2013

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The recently upgraded Redis connector for Mule allows you to interact with this NoSQL data-store in a convenient manner. This blog is a tutorial that you can follow in order to get your feet wet with Redis, if you don’t know it already, or Mule, if you have Redis experience and want to see how they both can work together.

In this tutorial, we will build a very simple back-end that captures page visit count for identified users via a web bug.