Implementing event-driven capabilities through existing APIs

In current technology growth, APIs are the standard for building and connecting modern applications. They provide a standardized interface that masks backend complexity and makes it simple for an enterprise to secure, monitor, and manage how the digital assets it shares are used. Below, we’ll take a look at the differences between RESTful and event-driven APIs, an overview of event-driven architecture, and how to implement event-driven capabilities into existing APIs.

Event-driven design: The power of event notifications

This is the second part of a series on “Moving from RESTful to EVENTful.”

As I see more and more companies working to add event-driven, sometimes called “real-time,” APIs to their programs, I am noticing that there are common cases where an event style is favored over others. Using Martin Fowler’s names as a reference point, I’m noticing that event sourcing (ES) and command-query responsibility segregation (CQRS) are the most commonly discussed event styles right now.

Moving from RESTful to EVENTful

For close to twenty years, the “common standard” of APIs on the web has been summed up in one word: “RESTful.” Designers, developers, and software architects have promoted, debated, and derided the notion of RESTful APIs in successive waves over the years with all sorts of pundits declaring REST “dead” and offering some other current practice as “the new REST” or, even better, “the REST killer.” Probably my favorite rejoinder in this space is Matt McLarty’s “

How to connect to Remedy Action Request using REST API

Enterprises use one or more service management applications to manage business-critical workflows and often synchronize workflow information, such as tickets or tasks, to adjacent applications like Salesforce, JIRA, etc. In some cases, enterprises choose to expose a subset of the information externally for partner consumption. BMC Remedy Action Request (AR) System is a popular service management application that MuleSoft offers an out-of-the-box connector for, using the Remedy AR Java API for accessing various modules and forms.

Simplifying Salesforce object interactions with the Salesforce Composite connector

SFDC Composite SObject Tree Flow.

If you have worked with Mule for any period of time you know that we provide deep support for interacting with Salesforce Clouds – including connectors, templates, and examples. But you may not be aware that Salesforce exposes many different APIs that our connectors leverage for these integrations. Many developers may be familiar with the real-time, bulk, or streaming integration patterns that Salesforce supports. This blog will touch on a lesser-known API resource Salesforce has released and the MuleSoft connector that supports it.  

API interaction types in a microservice architecture: queries, commands, and events

Query Command Event

One of the debates that’s been smoldering since the microservices movement began is how microservices should communicate with one another.

GraphQL and the API gateway

MuleSoft Application Network

GraphQL provides front-end developers a query layer that returns back-end data from diverse, complex sources in a friendly and efficient way. Learn more about the relationship between GraphQL and Anypoint Platform.

Building reusable components with REST Connect and Mule 4

Earlier this month, at MuleSoft CONNECT 2018, we unveiled Titan, the next major release of Anypoint Platform. A major component of this release includes Mule 4 and Studio, which offers an easy way to create reusable connectivity assets, like connectors and APIs, through REST Connect.

Round-up: The 7 most popular blog posts from 2017

blogs mulesoft

This year, we published over 215 blog posts spanning a wide variety of topics––from why messaging queues suck to why ESB-led integration is no longer an adequate approach for organizations.

Check out the top 7 most popular blog posts for this year!  

Dev Guide: Design Reusable APIs to Save Time (Part 1)

reusable apis developer how to

Here at MuleSoft, we talk a lot about how API-led connectivity can speed up your development cycles, and I’m here to guide you through how to do it. The API-led approach is a natural evolution from developing libraries, writing digestible markdown files, and sharing them on GitHub.