Continuous Integration with Mule and Gradle

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We use automated build systems not only because they make our lives easier by taking care of building our apps, but because they can run our automated tests and deploy what we build to the target platform. One of our options for building applications (especially Mule applications) is Gradle. The Gradle plugin for Mule apps provides a variety of ways to deploy Mule apps and that’s what we’ll be covering in this post!

Gradle Builds Reach Anypoint Studio

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This is the fourth post on the Gradle series. At this time, I’m pleased to introduce two improvements we’ve made towards enabling our users to build apps with Gradle: we’ve created a new plugin for Anypoint Studio, and added support for Gradle 2.0.

Anypoint Studio Gradle Support

We recently created a visual plugin for Anypoint Studio, available as part of the Anypoint Add-ons (beta) project.

Building Enterprise Mule Apps with Gradle – Part 3

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Building Mule apps with Gradle and Mule Studio – Part 2

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Recently, I discussed how to build mule integrations using Gradle. This is a follow up post to discuss how to work with this plugin and mule studio, and to discuss some relevant enterprise features. This post assumes you already know how to do the basic setup of the gradle plugin (discussed on my previous post), so if you have not done it before, please go ahead and read it before continuing.

Building Mule Apps With Gradle

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Gradle is gaining more and more popularity as a build system. It combines the power of scripting with the simplicity of conventions. Declarative builds are very straightforward, where customizations do not end up in tons of messy configurations.

Currently, Mule has two ways of building projects:

  • Apps can be built through Mule Studio, which is simple by nature but not very friendly with continuous integration,