How to set up WhatsApp notifications with Anypoint Platform

WhatsApp-MuleSoft-Nexmo

By adding WhatsApp Business to Anypoint Platform via Nexmo, MuleSoft offers its users a direct path to WhatsApp implementation.

Dev Guide: How to Design a Process API (Part 2)

reusable apis developer how to

Before we get started with this blog, if you haven’t checked out Part 1 of this Dev Guide series, make sure you work through that first, where we went through developing a resilient, governable, and flexible API layer on top of your source systems—what we call system APIs.

Dev Guide: Design Reusable APIs to Save Time (Part 1)

reusable apis developer how to

Here at MuleSoft, we talk a lot about how API-led connectivity can speed up your development cycles, and I’m here to guide you through how to do it. The API-led approach is a natural evolution from developing libraries, writing digestible markdown files, and sharing them on GitHub.

HowTo (DevOps) – Leveraging MUnit For Test Automation Guide

Traditional integration platforms could get away with providing some command line tools to automate the build and deployment of applications built on their platform. But in the modern world, integration platforms need to encompass the critical API management & cloud components as well, so the scope of continuous integration and continuous delivery tools are no longer just limited to integration applications only.

This also requires support for provisioning integration software and applications in private or public cloud platforms and capability to automate governance of deployed applications.

HowTo – Apply an OAuth policy on a REST API

In the previous post in the “APIfy your integrations” series, we went through an API design-first approach to building integrations to back-end systems.

We defined the API specification using RAML, implemented the API by importing the RAML into Anypoint Studio and deployed the implementation to mule runtime in cloud or on-premise.

We are now ready to share the API with the developer community.

HowTo – REST API proxy to SOAP webservice

This blog post is a continuation of our first How To series, “APIFy your integrations,” where we started off by creating a SOAP API around a database.

Some organizations are entirely invested in either SOAP or RESTful web services. There is plenty of material already written on SOAP vs. REST, so there’s no need for us to take that on here.

It can be a use case driven decision where SOAP and REST can co-exist.

Mule Studio Visual Flow Debugger Walk-through

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Have you already tried the Visual Flow Debugger? It’s one of the new shiny features that comes with Mule Studio Enterprise 3.4. Well, if you haven’t used it yet, this post is for you:

1. Message Browsing – All the information you ever wanted, now at a click’s distance.

Before Visual Debugger, if you wanted to see the contents of the payload at each point you had to clutter your mule configuration with loggers all over the place,

Cross domain REST calls using CORS

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To fight XSS attacks, the web browser imposes the same origin policy for HTTP requests made by JavaScript code:

But there are a lot of use cases where this kind of cross domain HTTP request is desired, so developers came up with some workarounds:

  • Server side proxy: the idea is to avoid cross domain requests in the browser by doing them on the server:To do that in Mule you can use the HTTP proxy pattern as explained in this post.

Automate your deployments with the Jenkins API

types of apis

The Jenkins build systemhas an open API which means we can do stuff with it. Today we’re going to automate the deployment of an application with a specific stable version.  Jenkins has a great UI, it’s very flexible indeed, but sometimes is not enough. For instance, for CloudHub we deploy a Jenkins build to our QA environment, according the period in our development cycle, and we also need to execute automated tests.

Implementing Custom Validation with DevKit

November 30 2011

1 comment.

Validating data can be easy with Mule if your message payloads are in certain formats.  XML payloads, for instance, can be verified for correctness via XML schema or XPath filters. Payload type filters and OGNL expression evaluation can go a long way in asserting your POJO payloads are correct.
Payloads with less structure, like Map or JSON data, are a little bit trickier to validate.  This is particularly true on the front-end of web-services where leniency in data format,