Beginners guide to Runtime Fabric: Install, configure, and test on AWS

January 14 2021

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More Mule customers are adopting MuleSoft Runtime Fabric. This mini-series covers several Runtime Fabric topics — including how to install, configure, test, and troubleshoot Runtime Fabric. Part one of the series will cover the Runtime Fabric installation on AWS.

The AWS Runtime Fabric install process is different from the traditional software install. With the traditional software install, users start with provisioning of the servers that will host the software.

How to use Object Store v2 to create a virtual Tic-Tac-Toe game

Sravan Lingam is a MuleSoft Ambassador and Sr. MuleSoft Developer at Virtusa. He spoke at the Developer Meetup during MuleSoft CONNECT:Now JAPAC. Below, he will discuss Object Store v2 and discuss how he built a Tic-Tac-Toe game using MuleSoft.

As a MuleSoft developer and Ambassador, I often try to expand my skillset and help others learn through what I call “fun-learning.” For example, to explain how to use Object Store v2 and demonstrate its capabilities,

How to be a matchmaker using DataWeave and regular expressions

In this blog, we’ll look at how a regular expression (regex) can give you the power to transform text in your DataWeave programming. When you need to select, replace, remove, or transform text, you can define a regex pattern to define what you want to match, and perhaps one that defines what you’d like to provide as a substitute.

How to review concatenation functions in DataWeave 2.0

Contrary to what most developers believe, there are different ways to achieve concatenation in DataWeave 2.0 for several data types. While the most popular function to achieve this is by using the plus plus (++) function, it is not the only way to concatenate data types. Before taking the Anypoint Platform Development: DataWeave (Mule 4) training, I used the ++ (plus plus) function to concatenate data types like arrays, strings,

How to deploy Anypoint Runtime Fabric in Oracle Cloud

Anypoint Runtime Fabric is a container service that automates the deployment and orchestration of Mule applications and API gateways. Runtime Fabric runs within a customer-managed infrastructure on AWS, Azure, virtual machines (VMs), and bare-metal servers.

Some of the capabilities of Anypoint Runtime Fabric include:

  • Isolation between applications by running a separate Mule runtime engine per application.
  • Ability to run multiple versions of Mule on the same set of resources.

4 ways to externalize MuleSoft logs to the Elastic Stack

The former Netflix Architect Allen Wang posted back in 2015 on SlideShare: “Netflix is a logging company that occasionally steams video.” 

Five years ago, Netflix was creating about 400 billion events per day in different event types. Today, organizations can’t afford for their applications to have slow performance or experience downtime. To prevent that, engineers must rely on the data generated by their applications and infrastructure.

How to untie multilevel structures with DataWeave recursive calls

August 10 2020

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It’s rare for developers to work with flat data structures — instead we often work with multilevel data structures. Normally, XML uses multiple layers of hierarchy. We need to perform changes on all the levels, without knowing how deep into the hierarchy we need to process the entire structure.

Developers typically use recursive calls to solve these types of problems. In this blog post, we will see how to implement simple recursive calls using DataWeave.

Setting up Anypoint VPN with Google Cloud Platform

There are a variety of ways to establish connectivity between Anypoint CloudHub workers and systems deployed on backend customer-hosted or vendor-managed data-centers. One of the ways is through Anypoint VPN which provides a secure tunnel between cloudhub workers and  a data-center. In order to setup the VPN tunnel or extend the CloudHub network with corporate network, we need to setup Anypoint VPC. Anypoint VPC provides an isolated network segment to host CloudHub workers. 

How to write curried functions in DataWeave

One of the most valuable characteristics of DataWeave is that it is a functional programming language. This means it is dynamically able to solve problems with various approaches — one being currying, which is a common feature of functional programming languages like Haskel (from where it derives), and JavaScript. 

In this post, I’ll explain what currying is and how to write curried functions in DataWeave.

How to break data silos: an example using Salesforce and Procore

Delivering rich and consistent experiences to stakeholders and customers is one of the objectives of digital transformation. Data provides context and enables business processes to create powerful experiences. As SaaS applications proliferate within the enterprise IT landscape it inadvertently results in data silos slowing transformation initiatives. According to MuleSoft’s 2020 Connectivity benchmark report, 89% of IT leaders say data silos are an obstacle to digital transformation.