DataWeave: Working with literal types

Literal types will let you define a type as an enumeration of possible values. This is useful in the use cases when a variable or function call can only take one out of a small set of possible values, for example, like days in a week (Saturday, Sunday, etc.) or HTTP request methods (GET, POST, DELETE, etc.). 

Understanding “big-O complexity” in DataWeave

Sometimes developers face optimization challenges in their code — regardless of the programming language they use. One of the most common optimization challenges is the complexity (or performance) of an algorithm that increases and grows infinitely when the number of arguments it has to process increases. This is called big-O complexity or big-O notation.

In this blog post, you’ll learn how to perform DataWeave code optimization to improve performance by following the big-O notation principles.

Announcing a new DataWeave tutorial series

Have you ever used DataWeave? In this three-part tutorial series, you will be guided through different DataWeave operators that you can use directly in your Anypoint Studio projects.

Error handling from an integration patterns perspective

In the world of data integration, error handling is crucial to a successful data integration strategy, however, it is often one of the most overlooked areas because, quite frankly, it can be quite intimidating when you initially try and understand it. In my series of blog posts, I hope to reduce this complexity by breaking it up into simple concepts that are easier to digest.  

5 things you need to know about MuleSoft Training and Certification

Update April 10: During these challenging and uncertain times, we want to make sure you have the MuleSoft training you need to drive your organization’s digital transformation. To equip you with skills for the future, we’ll be hosting instructor lectures to accompany our free self-paced Development Fundamentals course. Lectures will run April 13 – May 29, 2020. Access this benefit by: 

  1. Registering for Development Fundamentals here.
  2. Enrolling in lectures here.

DataWeave function chaining for Java programmers

In this article, you will learn how to use method chaining in DataWeave with reference to Java 8 lambda expressions and how to convert from Java Streams into DataWeave chaining. 

Java 8 introduced the Stream API, which is used to process a stream of objects. Various methods can be chained together such as filter, limit, map, and reduce,

How to use JSON Web Token (JWT) validation policy

Do you want to establish secure transactions between clients and your APIs? Do you want to know a safe way to represent information between two parties? Or confirm that the data was sent by an authentic source? JSON Web Token (JWT) is a compact way to securely transmit information between two parties. If you have questions regarding API security, read along to discover why MuleSoft JSON Web Token Validation Policy is one of the ways to safely protect your APIs. 

Use case-specific error handling in Mule 4

popular error types

Often times when you are processing data through a flow, you may want to treat certain errors differently than others. For instance, if you are trying to select records from Salesforce, you would want to handle a record not found error differently than an out of memory error. For this reason, MuleSoft allows us to handle errors based on use cases as well as the types of errors that are being thrown.

Mule 4 error handling deep dive

on error continue main flow

In my previous blog post, I discussed the basics of error handling with Mule 4, helped understand what a Mule error is, what the two major error handling scopes in Mule 4 are, as well as how they work. In this post, I will discuss how to take these basic concepts and build them up so that you can implement error handling strategies in your application (and not be completely lost when doing so).

Mule 4 error handling demystified

Mule 4 error handling

Like many developers and architects who build APIs and integrations, I was on top of the world when I completed the training on Anypoint Platform Development fundamentals (Mule 4); I was now able to take an idea for an API and build, design, deploy, and implement my API in a matter of hours. I now held the shiny key to become a MuleSoft Certified Developer — I just had to pass the MuleSoft Certified Developer –