Super simple data integration with RESTx: An example

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Most people who ever worked in real-world data integration projects agree that at some point custom code becomes necessary. Pre-fabricated connectors, filter and pipeline logic can only go so far. And to top it off, using those pre-fabricated integration logic components often becomes cumbersome for anything but the most trivial data integration and processing tasks.

With RESTx – a platform for the rapid creation of RESTful web services – we recognize that custom code will always remain part of serious data integration tasks.

The new @Schedule annotation in Mule and iBeans

December 17 2009

1 comment.
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Scheduling is great, it really is. It’s also very useful for application integration since we often have to repeat tasks of over time interval or schedule tasks for a date in the future. Mule has had scheduling support since version 1.1 with the Quartz connector, now with iBeans scheduling just got easier. iBeans offers a annotations-based API for performing common integration tasks such as sending email, subscribing to a JMS queue or polling an ATOM feed.

Using JSON bindings with iBeans

December 15 2009

2 comments
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JSON, short for JavaScript Object Notation, is a lightweight data interchange format. It is a text-based, human-readable format for representing simple data structures and associative arrays (called objects).

Many REST services use JSON as the preferred data format (including Tcat Server’s REST API). JSON provides a much simpler model for data representation and is widely used in AJAX programing.

iBeans support binding JSON data to objects and marshaling Java objects to JSON using the excellent Jackson Framework.

Twitter your Blog with iBeans

December 9 2009

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Most websites offer RSS or ATOM feeds for news or updates, and iBeans makes it easy to consume these feeds. In this example, I will create a simple object that will read new entries from my blog and publish a summary of them on Twitter. Note that the example assumes that you have iBeans installed.

iBeans from Devoxx

November 23 2009

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I went to Devoxx last week to present “iBeans – dead simple integration for the web”. Since the slides are pretty readable I figured I’d post them here for folks that missed it. I jotted down the questions and answers from the session below.

Getting Started with iBeans in Eclipse

November 11 2009

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This screen cast takes you through all the steps necessary to download and set up iBeans, Tomcat and Eclipse. Then there is a walk-through of how to create a simple echo example (using AJAX) and test/debug the application on Tomcat. Yes, this is 11 minutes but it does walk through all the steps and provides a lot of additional detail. Grab yourself a beverage and take the the tour!

iBeans introductory screencast

November 4 2009

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I just finished an iBeans screen cast that provides an overview of iBeans and provides a detailed tour of one of the examples that ships with the latest distribution. The example demonstrates how to schedule a task and perform bi-directional AJAX communication with the browser to plot geo-coordinates onto a map. This is the first in a series of screen casts for iBeans, the next one will demonstrate how to create an iBeans project in Eclipse.

How to Build a Recession-Proof SOA Strategy

January 26 2009

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My article on creating an SOA strategy in this tough climate was just published on eWeek:

The current economic crisis and recession is affecting both IT spending today and budgets for 2009. Often viewed as a major cost center, IT becomes one of the first areas where senior management looks to make cuts when times are tight. Here, Knowledge Center contributor Ross Mason explains how to build a recession-proof, service-oriented architecture strategy.

How to Define Services

January 20 2009

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Defining what constitutes a service when building service-orientated applications seems to be a common problem for developers and architects who are new to building services. The main issue seems to be the scope, i.e. what is the granularity of the service. This is actually quite difficult since the granularity of a service can vary depending on the application. The trick with any fuzzy problem is to break it into smaller pieces. There is a very simple service taxonomy defined in Thomas Erls SOA in Principals of Service Design book which I believe makes the approach to defining services much easier.