Having Some REST with Mule’s Power Tools

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This is a guest blog entry by David Dossot, co-author of the soon-to-be-released book Mule in Action.

I recently had the opportunity to integrate a bunch of REST resources and came to further appreciate what I consider to be Mule’s power tools: scripting and expressions (there is a third tool in my power box, Spring, but I won’t discuss it here).

Scripting, and more precisely Groovy,

Sneak Peak at Mule 3.x: It’s Hot!

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We’ve been busy working on Mule releases recently, so this blog hasn’t had as much developer voice as it deserves. Working on things like WebSphere MQ can be demanding, which is another reason to appreciate the all-new shiny WebSphere MQ connector in Mule Enterprise 2.2.1. Makes one’s life much much easier.

That is not to say we didn’t cure our (and your) itch for new features. Many great ideas are currently being born,

Congrats to Ross – awarded a top 25 CTO by InfoWorld

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Yesterday, Ross Mason, our very own fearless leader, was awarded one of the top 25 CTOs by InfoWorld magazine. Every year InfoWorld honors senior IT executives who demonstrated leadership within their company and the IT community. As many of you know, with so much product and community momentum this year at MuleSource it’s been quite a ride and Ross definitely deserves this award. Congrats to Ross!

Galaxy on EC2 via Cloud Foundry in 10 minutes!

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A couple of months ago, I reviewed the process for deploying Mule Galaxy, our SOA governance platform, onto Amazon’s EC2. Not long after that, I was introduced to cloudtools, a set of tools for deploying, managing, and testing Java EE applications on EC2. With these tools, it becomes trivial to deploy an application like Mule Galaxy to the cloud in minutes, rather than hours.

Technical Webinar tomorrow: Mule for ETL

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Are you trying to poll a database and transform the results to a certain plain text file? Do you need to pick up a data file, split it into individual records and insert those records into the database? Would you like to poll a source database and send the results to another database for insertion?

Error Handling in Mule

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Mule provides different approaches to handling errors. You can set exception strategies for connectors, models, and individual services. You can use the exception router to specify where the message goes when an error occurs. And you can use the exception type filter for fine-grained control. Following is an introduction to these approaches.

New Mule Financial Information eXchange (FIX) Transport on the MuleForge

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As you may have seen, a new Mule Financial Information eXchange (FIX) transport project was recently made available on the MuleForge. A big kudos to the project owner, Stephen Fenech, and the team at Ricston for making this project available.

FIX is a public domain protocol aimed at real-time electronic exchange of securities transactions in the Financial Services industry, and is considered to be a standard protocol for pre-trade communications and trade execution.

Getting a Response from your Mule Services

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When wiring your Mule services together, new users sometimes get confused about when to use an outbound router and when it’s sufficient to simply get a reply. Following is a description of the three message styles you can use to get a response from your Mule services.

Interview about MuleSource at QCon

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During the QCon conference in San Francisco, I filmed an interview with Ryan Slobojan. Despite being flu-ridden throughout the week, I managed to make it through this conversation without passing out (or worse!). It was an interesting conversation, covering:

  • What the Mule ESB and Mule Galaxy are
  • Mule ESB Enterprise versus Community
  • MuleSource’s monitoring solution
  • Cloud-based deployments
  • The recession’s effect on open source

Ryan asked some good questions around differentiators and roadmap during the interview,

Automatic Pickup of Third-party Transports and Modules

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In a previous blog post about the Mule IDE, I described its configuration wizard, which makes it very easy to create a Mule configuration file by selecting the modules and transports you want to include. Today I’d like talk more about what’s going on under the hood and explain how the Mule IDE discovers modules and transports from the Mule distribution directory.